E.U. GIVES POLAND 24-HOUR DEADLINE TO TAKE IN MIGRANTS

25

The European Union is giving the nations of Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic a 24-hour deadline to take in refugees under the E.U. migrant sharing plan or else risk being referred to the European Court of Justice and face fines. E.U. Migration Commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos has said that the central European nations have ignored the E.U., telling them to take their share of the Muslim migrants pouring into Europe.

The E.U. agreed to take in 160,000 migrants, distributed across nations in proportion to each nation’s size and wealth. Polish Deputy Foreign Minister Konrad Szymanski said the move by the E.U. serves to only worsen existing European divisions on the issue of migrants. “From the political point of view, this action … unnecessarily heats up political tensions of which there are already too many in the European Union.”

He further added that Poland was prepared to legally defend itself, “If necessary, Poland is ready to defend its legal arguments in court.”

In April, Poland’s Law and Justice Party (PiS) initiated the construction of camps made of converted shipping containers, reversing the course of the previous government, which agreed to a share of 7,000 asylum seekers.

“When it comes to reducing the chances of Poland being hit by [Islamist] terror attacks, the only proven method is to not allow in Muslim migrants,” said Ryszard Czarnecki of Poland’s center-right Law and Justice party.

Speaking on the subject of Islamic migration and attacks in the U.K., Czarnecki criticized British tolerance of Islamist Muslim leaders who are not deported once identified. “With regards to Britain,” he said, “we have already told them on several occasions they need to deport not tolerate radical migrants.”

“If a radical Muslim cleric in a mosque calls on his brothers in the faith … to fight the infidels, well, I think that there are grounds to expel such an imam,” Czarnecki said.
The importing of migrants in the fashion of Western European nations is extremely unpopular in Poland, with a recent poll showing 74 percent of Poles do not favor bringing in migrants from Africa or the Middle East.

Poland stands out in Europe as one of the few remaining nations with a thriving Catholic life. The home of Pope St. John Paul II, St. Faustina and St. Maximilian Kolbe, Poland is still 87 percent Catholic, according to the CIA World Factbook. Not surprisingly, the country’s bishops made an act of recognition of Christ as King of Poland, Church Militant reported last November.

The act of recognition read in part,

We profess in face of God and Earth, that we need your rule. We profess, that you and only you have holy rights to us that never expired. Therefore, with humility we bend our heads to you, the Lord of the Universe, and we recognize your rule over Poland and our whole nation, that lives in the motherland and away in the wide world. Hereby, Poland in the 1,050th anniversary of its baptism, solemnly recognizes the rule of Jesus Christ.

Church Militant reported that the Polish bishops, in fidelity to the teaching of the Church and of Our Blessed Lord, a priest representing the Bishops’ Conference affirmed that the Pope’s Apostolic Exhortation Amoris Laetitia does not change Church teaching “in the case of Holy Communion for people who live in non-sacramental relations.”

Most recently, Polish bishops on Tuesday, in the presence of Polish President Andrzej Duda and Prime Minister Beata Szydło, consecrated Poland to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. The Act of Consecration contains references to true marriage and false tolerance. It reads in part, “Mother of the Holy Family of Nazareth, guardian of Polish families … we want to do everything necessary to defend the dignity of women and support spouses’ faithful perseverance in the holy sacramental relationship. We commit ourselves to defend marriage established by God and not to give a hearing to whispers of the evil spirit, encouraging us to abuse the freedom to pursue and misunderstood tolerance.”

Share Your Opinion